Digital Art Source invited a group of international artists, curators and theorists of new media art to recommend a text (or group of texts) for students. The responses we received are below. Our thanks to the participants.
 
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Alan Sondheim
I would like to recommend two email lists: nettime-l@bbs.thing.net and webartery@onelist.com. Nettime deals with cultural practice from a somewhat political-theoretical stance; Webartery is concerned with both practical and theoretical matters in relation to Web art. There is also the 7-11 list at 7-11@mail.ljudmila.org - which presents the URLs of codework - such as Mez' and Antiorp's.

Email lists can be extremely useful resources, since they represent a continuous dialog which may take into account the continuously changing protocols, applications, and delivery modes of the Internet.

Two software applications I highly recommend: Blender, for 3D modelling (both still images and video); and Gimp (for linux), which is an excellent image production tool. I particularly like Blender's interface, whichis non-intuitive, and forces one to give up old habits, and rethink videoand image from a different perspective. (In this regard, it's similar to
Max, Nato55, etc.) Blender is written in the Python programming language, and has a language/application interface which allows the user to program her own objects. Gimp, because it's in linux, is extremely open, and images can be tossed through any number of other applications, giving a mobile production environment. (Blender can also run in linux.) Also, both are free.

I would definitely recommend linux as an operating system; otherwise, one coasts on blanked surfaces...

In relation to books: I have yet to find one that I could wholeheartedly recommend, but there is Nettime's Read Me! anthology from Autonomedia:ReadMe! Filtered by Nettime: ASCII Culture and the Revenge of Knowledge -
there are numerous editors. (In terms of technical books, I rely on O'Reilly's publishing - there is also http://safari.oreilly.com - a subscription resources which allows you to access five of their books on a monthly basis for $9.95 - it saves a great deal of money in the long run.)

For online sites there is always Slashdot - one of the best communities going.

For writing/literature/dhtml/hypermedia, there is the trAce (sic) Online Writing Community at http://trace.ntu.ac.uk - which has a very lively webboard presenting a number of useful conferences, as well as both subsidiary projects, courses, weekly chats, and so forth. (I was trAce's second virtual-writer-in-residence.)

I'd also like to recommend my own URLs and cdrom below - coupled with the understanding that they're beyond quirky.

Internet Text at http://www.anu.edu.au/english/internet_txt
Partial at http://lists.village.virginia.edu/~spoons/internet_txt.html
Trace Projects at http://trace.ntu.ac.uk/writers/sondheim/index.htm
     
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